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A Churchill Makes a Better Line

Saturday, June 25, 2005

 

Don Alejandro Robaina

Don Alejandro Robaina

About 20 minutes outside of Pinar Del Rio we turned left off of a simple highway onto a bumpy dirt road. The previous 20 minutes had been spent diving on the two lane road that goes into San Juan and San Luis, both sides of the road brimming with picturesque tobacco fields.

This dusty road took us left and right in a difficult route, finally putting us at the home of the humble yet famous Alejandro Robaina. I knew very little about the license plates in Cuba, but I know that the blacks one were for important people... there were 2 parked out side. As we got out of the car, an ox driven cart passed full of bright green leaves, something that has done thousands of times before, for over a hundred years.

We turned the corner and entered the porch, there were 4 or 5 other guests puffing on cigars. Apparently they had been waiting sometime, because Alejandro was taking a nap. Shortly after our arrival they left. His cousin or brother, who served as the host, invited us to some cigars and rum. I passed on the rum and finished my single robust that I bought from the Tobacco Roller in the Casa Del Habano earlier (True Cigar Tip: Always take care of the tobacco roller).

Don Benigno, my dear friend, who grew up in Pinar Del Rio knew the entire family and staff at Alejandro's home. It was Don Benigno that took me to Cuba with him and that drove me out on this very interesting tobacco tour. After some brief conversation, someone went inside and came out with the a older man that looked worked to the bone, yet one of the most distinctly comely men I have ever met. Don Alejandro Robaina is neither tall nor short, he is skinny, but omits strength, and portrayed such a distinct humility that I was immediately enamored with him.

Don Alejandro RobainaAfter some additional customary conversation about their family, things got deep- deep in the form of some very technical conversation about the crop, rain, and some studies that had been done on the soil. My Spanish is pretty good, but I get lost in technical conversations, especially between masters. I was finishing up my cigar, and Don Alejandro invited us to some special cigars that he made to give out at the Habanos Festival. What a cigar! Again, a robusto- with a wrapper that looked like a dark chocolate. Don Alejandro invited us across the way into his special reception and guest house that the government had recently built for him. This very nice home, by any standards, had beautiful wood work and was chocked full of thousand dollar humidors. We passed into the back room, the bar- with couches and very attractive ashtray holders. The conversation continued, and we continued to smoke. Don Alejandro took only a few puffs here and there, as I found out that he has had to be cautious of his health- I could tell he missed being able to smoke like he used to.

This special day is something that I will always remember. On my next trip to Pinar Del Rio, I hope to visit him again, and spend some more time with one of the most famous tobacco farmers of all time. There are many others like, him but his humility and work ethic earned him the respect of the world and of his own dictator. His namesake cigars are one of the top lines offered by Cuba, and out of respect to him I suggest every smoker try to keep at least one of his cigars in their humidor.
Vegas Robaina Box

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Wednesday, June 22, 2005

 

The Cigar Wrapper - So Misunderstood...

Conneticut, Shade Grown, Maduro... Cigars have more suits than I do. Although, the wrapper is very misunderstood.

The wrapper is called "capa" in Spanish, which translates more accurately to cloak or cape. The function of the wrapper is simply that a cape or cloak- and think of the wrapper as a nothing more than a cape wrapped around the cigar.

The wrapper is a special leaf. Smaller almost insignificant veins, oily silk-like texture, and an elastic anatomy are the qualities of a good wrapper. To achieve this, nearly every aspect of the of the agricultural and production process is very different from that of the filler.

There are several variations of color based changing certain elements in the process. The most common variations are listed here.
Six Types of Cigar Wrappers
Some are more common than others, some are more popular than others, and within each of these categories there are many variations.

Why do I say that the wrapper is misunderstood... Just like an idiot in a nice jacket, what is on the inside it what makes the cigar. Do not be mislead, maduro or oscuro wrapper are not stronger. Oscuro wrapper may leave a stronger taste in your mouth, but that is coming from the unsmoked tobacco and isn't a good sign at all.

So in short, do not be mislead, and do not be tricked, the wrapper does not make a cigar stronger, nor does it make it better (if it is garbage on the inside). Don't get me wrong, a beautiful wrapper is a great way respect a great cigar, but my advice is- Don't get too caught up with the wrapper.

A pampered natural wrapper is what I prefer, slightly dark, and a little shiny, although the best cigar I ever smoked actually had no wrapper at all. It's binder was prepared and humidified like a wrapper. It left a raisiny flavor in my mouth, and I loved every puff.

So don't get caught up, and Enjoy!

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Wednesday, June 01, 2005

 

Review - Cohiba Siglo VI

~FROM 5/29/2005~
Name:
Cohiba Size: Siglo VI
Origin: Cuba Construction: Hand
Purchased: Gift Price: ?
Smoked: Office Accompanied by: Nothing

I have been a fan of the canonasso size cigars for some time, but never tried the Cohiba Siglo VI until now. This is an impressive cigar just to look at. Sliding this large tobacco out of the tube, with the name Cohiba wrapped around a fat ring size, makes even the most seasoned smoker take a deep breath.

The fragrance of the unlit tobacco was impressive, sweet and complex. The brown wrapper reminded me of the Montecristo #2 that I recently picked up in Cuba for some friends. I cut the end and too a few puffs before I lit it- the ‚??raisiny‚?? flavor filled my mouth.

I lit up the massive cigar with one match and a few puffs. Wow! What a flavor- literally typing my notes is making my mouth water for another. The creamy smoke had such a full flavor that you didn‚??t even notice it‚??s strength until you inhaled it or passed it through your nose.

The cigar burned steady with a even ash all the way down. The flavors were natural and deep- like taking a deep breath in the forest just after a rain. This was a very pleasurable cigar, although knowing what they go for, probably not an everyday smoke for everyone‚?¶

Those of you interested in a hearty Cuban cigar, should get your hands on one of these. This is a cigar that I will remember for a long time.

Overall Score: 96/100
Flavor:
95/100
Construction: 95/100
Presentation:
98/100

A special thanks to Dave for the gift...

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